Titre: Espaces d’apprentissage dans quatre établissements postsecondaires: exploration du sens, de la place et de l’impact de l’espace sur l’apprentissage.

 

Pendant plusieurs jours, plus de cent mille étudiants suivent des cours dans les campus postsecondaires du Collège Algonquin, de l’Université Carleton, de La Cité et de l’Université d’Ottawa. Ces apprenants participent à de nombreux types d’activités d’apprentissage dans différentes disciplines dans un ensemble incroyablement diversifié d’espaces d’apprentissage. Hunley et Schaller (2006) ont noté que la conception des espaces d’apprentissage peut avoir un impact significatif sur les comportements de nos apprenants et enseignants.

 

Au cours de cet atelier d’une journée, les participants auront l’occasion d’explorer une variété d’espaces d’apprentissage différents dans les quatre plus grands établissements postsecondaires d’Ottawa. Chaque institution présentera des éléments des espaces d’apprentissage de leurs campus et abordera des aspects tels que:

 

  1. comment une bonne conception peut soutenir un apprentissage actif et influencer les pratiques pédagogiques engageantes,
  2. les défis de la modernisation des espaces d’apprentissage
  3. apprentissage expérientiel interactif
  4. créer des espaces d’apprentissage inclusifs
  5. évaluer les espaces d’apprentissage

 

Les participants participeront à des activités pratiques et à des discussions tout au long de la journée concernant les différents éléments de l’espace d’apprentissage et les approches adoptées dans chaque établissement. À la fin de l’atelier, les participants repartiront avec des outils et des stratégies pratiques concernant la conception des espaces d’apprentissage et les différents éléments partagés dans chacune des quatre institutions.

 

Les frais comprennent le transport et le diner.

 

Hunley, S., Schaller, M., 2006. Assessing learning spaces. In: Oblinger, D. (Ed.), Learning Spaces. Educause, pp. 166-176. Retrieved from https://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/PUB7102.pdf

 

Facilitateurs:

Farbod Karimi, Collège Algonquin

David Hornsby, Université Carleton

Patrick Lyons, Université Carleton

Lise Frenette, La Cité

Aline Germain-Rutherford, Université d’Ottawa

Marc Villeneuve, Université d’Ottawa

Identifying Complicity in Colonialism: Deploying Disrupting Interviews to Decolonize

« Following the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, universities across Canada are working at the institutional level to address the Calls to Action. This work illuminates the extent to which our institutions, its disciplines and our identities maintain colonial knowledge production through scholarship and teaching. Decolonizing the University requires working with individual professors to un-settle both their own and their discipline’s scholarly and/or pedagogical practices.

Informed by cross-institutional collaboration through an Education Canada EDGEs grant, this workshop explores our proposed adaptation to the Decoding the Disciplines interview (Pace & Middendorf, 2004) to help individuals identify complicit knowledge, which silently functions to reproduce settler-colonial society and its practices (Tuck and Gastambide-Fernández 2013).

Through the workshop we show how the Disrupting Interview’s introspective acts of reflection illuminates implicit colonial ideologies that are reproduced in curriculum development. These reflections offer starting points for decolonizing disciplinary knowledge and practices.

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Teaching Strategies for the “Learning Mind”

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2.Celebrating Outcomes of Teaching Philosophies of 3M Teaching and HERDSA Fellows: What Can We Learn and Apply

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Identifying Complicity in Colonialism: Deploying Disrupting Interviews to Decolonize

Following the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, universities across Canada are working at the institutional level to address the Calls to Action. This work illuminates the extent to which our institutions, its disciplines and our identities maintain colonial knowledge production through scholarship and teaching. Decolonizing the University requires working with individual professors to un-settle both their own and their discipline’s scholarly and/or pedagogical practices.

Informed by cross-institutional collaboration through an Education Canada EDGEs grant, this workshop explores our proposed adaptation to the Decoding the Disciplines interview (Pace & Middendorf, 2004) to help individuals identify complicit knowledge, which silently functions to reproduce settler-colonial society and its practices (Tuck and Gastambide-Fernández 2013).

Through the workshop we show how the Disrupting Interview’s introspective acts of reflection illuminates implicit colonial ideologies that are reproduced in curriculum development. These reflections offer starting points for decolonizing disciplinary knowledge and practices.

Indigenous Learning Bundles: Engaging STLHE and 3M Teaching Fellows and Students in Continuing Reconciliation Work

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Building Multimodal, Nonlinear, and Interactive Learning Experiences: A Deep Dive into the Tapestry Tool

The Tapestry Tool (tapestry-tool.com) is a newly-developed learning tool created by University of British Columbia students, faculty, and staff. It allows for non-linear, dynamic, easily updatable, and student-centered content. The Tapestry Tool is being designed to allow for student/faculty co-creation of knowledge, to engage students with their learning community, and to enhance learning experiences across disciplines.

This workshop begins with coverage of both the theoretical underpinnings for the Tool, and several use cases for the Tapestry Tool. You will then get a chance to discuss other possible use cases in small groups. Following that, you will create your own “Tapestry,” either individually or in a small group. You’ll see non-linear and interactive learning design in action, and walk out with new perspectives on online teaching and learning.